KNEE PAIN FROM A MENISCUS INJURY

Do you have knee pain?
Do you feel popping in your knee when you walk?
Is there stiffness and/or swelling in your knee?
Do you feel pain when rotating or pivoting on your knee?
Is there difficulty with straightening the knee?
Do you feel a sensation of locking or catching when using your knee?

Source: https://painbloc24.com/knee-pain/


You might be suffering from a meniscal injury in your knee. This blog will outline the condition of a meniscus injury, the symptoms that can be present and effective management. If your knee pain does not improve, please seek help from your local Brisbane physiotherapist with clinics both in Jindalee and Darra.

WHAT IS THE MENISCUS?
The meniscus of the knee plays an important role in everyday function. It acts as a shock absorber and also helps with lubrication of the knee. Injuries to this area can cause marked changes in how the knee functions. Twisting and pivoting on the knee can cause sharp pain in the knee when the meniscus is injured.

Credit: https://www.sports-health.com/sports-injuries/knee-injuries/understanding-meniscus-tears


There are two parts of the meniscus: the inner (medial) and outer (lateral) portions. The inner portion usually sustains more forces due to our center of mass falling between our feet. Simply, the design of the meniscus is to provide stability to the knee and facilitate frictionless movement of the knee.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE MENISCUS IS INJURED?
A meniscal injury refers to either a tear or a rupture of the meniscus. This can happen in two ways: either through trauma or degeneration. Traumatic meniscus injuries are often seen in athletes due to the aggressive demand on the knee from sports. As stated before, due to the inner meniscus being more readily impacted, tears on this inside meniscus are more common. Degenerative meniscal tears can also occur through the weakening of the meniscus. Ageing is one of the factors that plays a role.
Meniscus Injuries
Traumatic Meniscal Tear

Source: https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases--conditions/meniscus-tears/


Common mechanism of injury: Twisting when the knee is slightly bent and taking weight.
Think of changing directions while running

Acute Tears result commonly from trauma i.e.from sport (soccer, tennis, basketball)
Chronic Tears most commonly occur in the elderly population. They're separate from degenerative meniscal tears because they occur after minimal trauma or stress through the knee.

Degenerative Meniscal Tear
Traumatic Meniscal Tear

Source: https://www.sports-health.com/blog/how-age-affects-your-risk-meniscus-tear


  • Occurs without trauma present
  • Happens due to age
  • Deterioration of the meniscus tissue has occurred
  • More common in the male population than female
  • Usually occurs in the fourth or fifth decade, but can occur in young athletes due to repetitive loading

WHAT ARE THE COMMON PRESENTING SYMPTOMS?
  • Tenderness across the knee joint
  • Can cause some swelling
  • Deep knee pain
  • Popping and locking of the knee that comes and goes
  • Pain with prolonged bending of the knee: Eg. kneeling on the knees
  • Pain with twisting and pivoting on the knee: Eg. getting in and out of the car and turning on the knee

HOW TO MANAGE YOUR MENISCAL PAIN
DO'S

Source: https://www.knee-pain-explained.com/vastus-medialis-exercises.html



HOW CAN PHYSIOPHI HELP?

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Anterior-posterior-glide-of-the-proximal-tibiofibular-joint_fig1_7221715



DISCLAIMER
If your knee pain is not getting better, you may need to book an appointment at Physiophi so that we can examine your knee. With our expertise, we can identify what structures are at fault, relieve the pain and make sure you understand the symptoms and treat your knee pain.

PLEASE CONTACT US ON: (07) 3172 4332 TO HAVE A CHAT WITH OUR FRIENDLY STAFF OR SIMPLY BOOK ONLINE ON: WWW.PHYSIOPHI.COM.AU

REFERENCES
Campbell, J., Harte, A., Kerr, D. P., & Murray, P. (2014). The location of knee pain and pathology in patients with a presumed meniscus tear: preoperative symptoms compared to arthroscopic findings. Ir J Med Sci, 183(1), 23-31. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11845-013-0965-3
Howell, R., Kumar, N. S., Patel, N., & Tom, J. (2014). Degenerative meniscus: Pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options. World J Orthop, 5(5), 597-602. https://doi.org/10.5312/wjo.v5.i5.597
Meniscus tears. Avoiding knee pain. (2012). Mayo Clin Health Lett, 30(11), 1-3. Risberg, M. A. (2014). Degenerative meniscus tears should be looked upon as wrinkles with age--and should be treated accordingly. Br J Sports Med, 48(9), 741. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2014-093568
Valter, R., Godeau, D., Leclerc, A., Descatha, A., & Fadel, M. (2019). Influence of severe knee pain, meniscus surgery and knee arthroplasty on physical ability: an observational study of 114 949 adults in the CONSTANCES cohort. BMJ Open, 9(12), e031549. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031549
Wolf, B. R., &Gulbrandsen, T. R. (2020). Degenerative Meniscus Tear in Older Athletes. Clin Sports Med, 39(1), 197-209. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2019.08.005
Østerås, H., Østerås, B., &Torstensen, T. A. (2014). Is postoperative exercise therapy necessary in patients with degenerative meniscus? A randomized controlled trial with one year follow-up. Knee Surg Sports TraumatolArthrosc, 22(1), 200-206. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00167-012-2354-2

TOP